Fiberglass Fan For Chemical Industry

CB Blower fans can be supplied to be gas tight and made of special materials to resist corrosion. Fans and turbo blowers are supplied to provide air for carbon black plants and for sulphuric acid plants.

Chemicals industry provides the widest range of challenges for rotating equipment. CB Blower Co. fans and blowers operate in conditions encompassing extreme pressure and temperature, and handle a wide range of gases containing aggressive and toxic components. Demanding specifications and strict safety requirements must be met and above all is the need for dependable operation over long periods.

CB Blower Co. fans meet the challenge of moving gases continually, reliably, efficiently and safely. They are built to API, or equivalent industry standards and their performance has been proven over many years of operation; and the blowers can meet unusual requirements that include dual drive systems with automatic drive engagement / disengagement and special materials of construction.

CB Blower Co. fans and pressure blowers are found in all major process plants. The range of applications is very wide but includes:

custom engineered centrifugal process fans for combustion air supply. These may be used directly for fired heaters for ethane or naphtha cracking plant and for processes with steam reforming such as methanol, or for boilers serving general utilities. Flue gas extraction and tail gas clean up are among the other applications for which we have supplied custom fans.
auxiliary boiler and other pre-engineered fans.
cooling fans for mechanical draught cooling towers, air-cooled heat exchangers and air-cooled condensers.
turbo blowers for sulphur recovery combustion and reaction air, sulphuric acid and carbon black plant
screw type pressure blower systems for process gas handling, notably for butadiene plants, gas turbine gas fuel compression and process refrigeration.
reciprocating turbo blowers for hydrogen processes – hydrocracking, visbreaking, catalytic reforming

The demands placed on equipment in the chemical industry are particularly high. Toxic, corrosive and unstable gases are frequently a part of chemical production processes. Maintaining the purity of gases being handled is a priority in the pharmaceutical and biological industries. CB Blower Co. supply a range of fan / blower types to the chemical industry, from fans for boiler and incineration plants that supply heat and process steam, to fans that are used on exhaust and emissions control systems to equipment that handles the materials being processed. In such a diverse industry the range of applications is very wide but there is often the need for special materials to prevent corrosion by gases such as wet hydrogen chloride and hydrogen sulphide. The blowers are adapted to meet these special needs.

For additional information please refer to http://www.cbblower.com/coolair.html

Oleg Chechel
Ventilation Equipment Designer
CB Blower Co.

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On Choosing an Open Source Digital Asset Management System

When I first blogged on open source digital asset management three years ago, it was a fairly new concept. The digital asset management product landscape was dominated by a few Enterprise-class vendors and a number of middle-tier workgroup solutions. Most case studies on open source digital asset management were for large non-profit university or library collections. Fast-forward to the present and we are starting to see case studies of open source digital asset management implementations for commercial organizations. There is also a growing community around open source digital asset management and a number of product options (14 at last count) in various stages of maturity. As more companies and organizations start to seriously consider open source as an option for digital asset management, it is important to outline a few key factors that should be considered when researching or choosing a system. 1.Core Digital Asset Management Features Prior to selecting or implementing a digital asset management solution, you should first determine what are the critical features that a system must support to meet the needs of your organization or company. Do you need the capability to manage and convert Camera RAW images? Do you need video transcoding and scene detection capabilities? Do you need self-service capabilities or extensive access control capabilities? Defining these critical needs prior to doing any research or viewing any demos will help to keep your selection process focused.

2.Availability of an Online Demo Open source vendors are not represented in Real Story Group’s Digital Asset Evaluation report, so it can be difficult to track down information on specific features. However, unlike proprietary ‘closed-source’ digital asset management products, which can be a hassle to get a try-before-you-buy license for, open source digital asset management systems are there for the testing. Therefore, it is important that you take advantage of that open-ness and test the products that are finalists in your comparative feature analysis. While this might be somewhat time-consuming, most companies that have been burned by spending a small fortune on a closed-source system would attest that product testing, ideally against a demo script that is baselined against your functional requirements, is a smart use of your time. To make testing easier for you, most open source digital asset management solutions have some form of Online Demo available either as an anonymous guest or as a registered user. Once you get your finalist list down to one or two choices, it still makes sense to install the product in your local environment for deeper testing of your use cases and particular integration needs.

3.Extensibility One open source perk is that with a smaller investment on licensing fees, a larger investment can be made on integrating the digital asset management solution with other content technology systems. In researching solutions, check to see if an open API is available. Does the system support RSS or Rest Services? Has the vendor or others in the community already integrated the system with other solutions?